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Search Results 0 to 49 of about 787 (some duplicates have been removed)
have been to the doctor and all of those things. this is the way that technology can help people) distant connect with us. 75% of our users say that we work with others to provide care and support. today, ties is three years old, and we have learned a lot about lessons with the good life. our number-one lesson is that no one should have to face thelma's, disability, or caregiving on their own. there are growing numbers -- why we did pay attention to this, constantly reaching out in creating our own networks, keeping them informed is one major reason, there are more and more of us living alone. 40% of people over 60 live alone. we are more vulnerable in terms of how we are living and we are more vulnerable because those of us are living with chronic and complex diseases. that can lead and capacity to it is a very positive thing to do. what we might think of as our desire is for the company and so on, our health is a social affair. our health is intimately tied with our connections and support. when we have a good network around us, we heal more quickly, we live longer. and when we
media and technology i didn't know there was a career path for it. everybody kept on telling me you should be a doctor, a lawyer because that's where the money is. the usual thing that parents say. it seemed to me you really have to be very lucky and hard working like a steven speilburg or end up video taping weddings which i have done and there is nothing wrong with. so in community college i finally decided to take a video production course which lead me to pursue a degree in broadcasting and i just dove in. my first semester at san francisco state i realized i would need some real world experience, and so i applied and was accepted into the internship at bay cat and i never left so i am still there. i learned so much there, not just the technical skills, but also soft skills needed to get hired in any work place. i love the work so much so i chose to stay on and i'm going to be a volunteer just to be able to learn the advance production skills and help the next generation of interns, so after graduating from college at sf state they offered me a job. they were employed me an
in san francisco, because so many of our technology companies have located their headquarters here in san francisco. [cheers and applause] and because they're located here, we can always ask them for a favor here and there and make sure no one is left out, because that is what we do in government. david chiu and i come from backgrounds where we do not want to leave anybody behind. we want everybody to enjoy the riches of technology. we want them to enjoy the economy in san francisco. that is why we're working so hard to make sure our central marketplace is welcoming of all these technology companies, making sure that we can work with other cities. i am very lucky to be part of the u.s. conference of mayors, and they allow me to represent san francisco as the innovative center for all the rest of the cities across the country. so we get to compare information and there. what these days i will get to talk to you while i am in washington, d.c., and you can hear what i am saying across there, so we can enjoy it -- wherever i go, you know i will be working and not fooling around. finally, we a
and placing them in the newest areas in our technology industry and when ron conway. ron just arrived and got out of at&t together. we worked together and had a personal agreement if we were as a city were to help technology we were going to have technology help us, so less than two years later when i first started the unemployment rate in san francisco was 9.6% and last friday we flipd that number in less than two years. [applause] lead my all the industries but most importantly by our technology industry. over 14,000, to 15,000 jobs were technology sector alone so it's right for us to make sure our future, our kids, our returning veterans, our people in their mid-career of their jobs now have an opportunity to really join in this job creating effort, and i still will say it's the private sector working with city government that's going to create the newest jobs for generations to come. today as part of the ongoing month of orange, month of innovation it's not only a celebration we all declared it innovation month and we wanted to make this announcement today about the steps we're taking
of range from writers and virtual wineries which are right behind me. to some of the leading technology companies in the valley. we have companies that raise anywhere from a thousand dollars to $25 million that have sort of been housed with us. some of the coolest things that have happened at the hatchery two people sitting next to each other working on the same app for six months decided to merge and raise a million dollars for their company. so, collaborative consumption is something we truly believe in and having spent a couple of years working with the likes of jane, brian, tina lee and a bunch of other people who have been sort of working on this open data problem, it's been sort of exciting to sort of see it come to fruition today and see sort of the progress that they've made. so, for me this is sort of -- it's been fun to sort of watch this team of people come together and do what they do and make san francisco a 21st century city. so, you know, it's an honor to welcome the mayor back to the hatchery, the new hatchery. we invite you, supervisor chiu, to our monthly infamous happ
are taking a look at some of the most exciting technologies in elevators. george, tell us about destination elevators. >> this is the technology of the future. probably the biggest single investment in elevators. san francisco has embraced the technology more than any other city in the country. a big advantage with us is passengers get to their floors sooner and there is more opportunity of customization of features for individual service. four issues of security and accessibility, this is a big advantage over traditional elevators. digest i understand these are rehabilitated upgrades of existing elevators? >> yes, these are upgrades to the original elevators from 1980. all the controls and wiring has changed but the physical mechanisms are the same. >> how much energy to these use? >> with all of the things that we did hear, energy savings is about 50% from where we started. that is a significant improvement for such a major system. >> tell me how it works. >> this is the hall keypad, which controls the elevator. the system asks where you are going before you get into the elevator. imagine
the need outside the elevator using current technology and we learn about the latest destination elevated technology all here in san francisco. we will also visit the machinery where all the behind- the-scenes gears control these incredible machines. we are very fortunate today to have an expert with those who is going to walk us are around elevators in san francisco. can you tell us about the history of elevators in san francisco? the measure -- >> sure. the history of elevator technology evolves with the city. first elevators were installed for moving materials in the 1860's. in the 1870's, the first passenger elevator was installed, and that allowed building heights to go up to about seven floors. starting in the 18 eighties, 1890's, the first electric elevators were installed. that allowed for buildings to go up even higher, even more than 10 floors, and those were the first elevators that became representative of what we consider modern elevators today. >> so the height of buildings is related to elevator technology. >> both of these technologies encourage architects to build taller
welcome to the technology summit. we are looking forward to a fantastic day. we are going to start with a demonstration of the wii system. it is an interactive gaming system that allows people to play different activities and participate in different fitness activities together. a lot of wii systems, about 40, are being deployed around the city to different senior centers and residents facilities to encourage older adults to get more involved with physical activity using technology. we're going to spend the first 30 minutes or so demonstrating the wii. not only will we demonstrate how to use it, but we will doe demonstrate adaptive devices so that it can be an inclusive activity for all adults and children. my name is dr. chris thompson from the university of san francisco. go, dons. 1855. i have not been there that long. i am in the department of exercise and sports science. i think it is a good match for me to be demonstrating the wii, which is a good physical activity. i am joined on the stage by a student, not from usf, but from san francisco state. we actually talk to each oth
to the core of may. and that is why i have learned the necessary needs of technology whto learn and to grw at to do things. and why you and i need the things you're going to hear in just a couple of minutes. i just want to take a quick moment as you get settled. you will have to stop talking because i will not talk over you. you, too. i'm going to count to ten. i usually don't have to finish to ten. when you think of technology in the world today, we can't even imagine what is going to have the month from now. think of the things that have been eaten up. we used to have payphones. they are gone. the cellphone 8 it up. the cellphone 8 of the camera industry. you don't need to buy a camera. the cellphone 8 the watch industry. i don't even wear a watch. you can go through the list. he you don't have to go to the bank anymore. take a picture of a check and make a deposit. look at all the things that we have changed. and change every day. if we can't imagine what is going to happen by christmas time. you don't even have to go to the pharmacy to say, fill this out. pick up a phone, punch in, go
samsung. oracle against google. these are just two recent high- profile court fights over technology patents. but those companies actually use their patents. a cluster of companies make money buying patents, and filing lawsuits to protect them. but here's the thing: suing is all they do with the patents, they don't actually use the technology. sylvia hall reports the practice is getting the attention of regulators. >> reporter: hipmunk is a website that aims to "take the agony out of travel planning." but this year the startup ran into some agony of its own-- it was slapped with a lawsuit claiming the company's technology violated a patent dating back to 1994. etsy.com, a popular marketplace for handmade goods, has also been sued by a different company this year based on a patent from 2005. th companiesiling the lawsuits aren't competitors. in fact, they don't even use the patented technologies they own. instead, they make money buying up patents and enforcing them in court. they're called non-practicing entities, but critics call them "patent trolls" and say they hurt innovation. >>
an environment that will be welcoming of the new economy, technology, and innovation to reinforce what we have been saying. we are the innovation capital of the world. with your help and involvement. we would like to have the rest of the city picked up and be part of it as well. we think we can have that conversation. we will need your help. we will need you to represent the new industry. these companies are here to keep the dialogue and collaboration at a high-level going with us. it is the ongoing dialogue like the one we are reading about a new tax structure for the city that does not punish the inventiveness we want to have. i would like to open with that introduction, welcome all of you here. i think he will see and hear an exciting introduction of these new companies. they're going to raise questions we do not have the answers to yet, but i do believe we have the spirit in this city to welcome solutions with your involvement. we will have the ability to do this on line as well is in these forums. i will be part of the ongoing discussion. i want to see all of you interact with the city an
there already but doesn't fill all the roof tops and there is new technology coming out all the time. we have been challenged in the solar technology arena because traditional technology has heavy weight technology that always challenged the integrity of roof tops, and moscone is the one we found and let that be for one of these companies and light ultralight technology and use, cheaper way of getting solar out there and we're going to allow them to demonstrate their product on top of our mos connie roof and that is an example we're doing in utilizing all of the agency's cooperations and make sure the start ups can use real testing sites in the city. that is thanks to the hardand kelly and the manager at puc and barbara hale and the second thing we're going to do is take a page out of what we're doing with clean tech and biotech life sciences. you see what mission bay is doing. they have for the last ten years building up a ecosystem of pharmaceutical companies and san francisco medical center and integrated around with the research teams to form a very strong research center and because of
, reduce the deficit, and begin to show leadership in various areas of new technology that demonstrated here to the rest of the world. kohl will always be there. -- coal is always going to be there. there's lots of work there. all the sales will help, i think, of leverage our capability and give us more options. >> let me bring you in. 92% of american transportation is run on petroleum. with this new landscape for energy production of, how are we doing on diversifying different kinds of things that are running our transportation? >> so far, it is going slow. something that was deeply focused on was something note senator alexander said earlier. we need to find more and use less. i think you're asking about the use less part. the extension of the changing fuel efficiency standards was one thing, but we believe fervently in the need to diversify away from using petroleum for transportation and given that it represents 70% of our use of petroleum to begin with. with the change in technology and the access to so much homegrown natural gas, we can use that and we can also use the development
to innovation. >>> 13 years ago, i like all of you started a company. i started in i-ti a technology company in the 1.0 world. it was a company that created technology to connect citizens better with government * . i ran it for almost nine years. and when i was elected to office four years ago, i was unfortunately more surprised than i wanted to be about how far behind san francisco government was. this was very 2008, 2009. with you i'm really proud of the leaps and bounds we have taken as a city * . i was proud in 2010 to help move forward legislation to really bring together city departments to work in a coordinated way with our committee on information technology. to help create a chief information officer position for the city. i was also proud to work with then mayor newsome in passing the first generation of open data legislation that we have. but as our civil grand jury in june pointed out, our i-t in san francisco is still in need of a culture shock. and this is where all of us come in today. we have 200 data sets that have already been put out there, but by and large the data sets p
of these. it is the no. one system and japan. not only is she the technology expert, she does not need to be a no no user anymore. she is one of the millions of people that this will work to get rid of the unwanted hair. >>guest: hair removal is usually nontechnical. to radiant see you see all of the countries worldwide, 3 million is a big number. maybe it has been on your favorite talk shows. and does this really work?we will talk about the technology in the moment we do have some exclusive fun colors this is the best place to get your no! no!. >>host: to purple, red, pink, silver, or black. you get your 8 in. cord, you have your boss ink pads, your cleaning brush, you your near a tip for the face--narrow step for the face. it everything you need for your face. under $50 to bring this home. normally we do an hour on the no! no! was on here,6 c13 sold 40,000 devotees. these [reading] da i will now that jennifer crawford explain to you how this works. than we think painful and then we think competitive. >>guest: you will on this for good. -- zero in this for good--own this for goo
. a big logo slide. >> and we're supposed to be about the technology. >> imagine a big stop bullying speak up logo on the slide behind me. >> say that again. >> stop bullying, speak up is the name of the campaign and a nice transition. my complements to everyone in the room. if i have learned everything in the last four years while researching bullying prevention and for our age group and the kids in the second through seventh grade it's that not only does it take a village but a village of people who are willing to partner and collaborate with each other and speak not only to adults about this issue but speak to children and i think it's an interesting transition from mia's work to mine. still not mine. >> it is but -- >> and the role we play at cartoon network and thousands of kids at home everyday and the role we play is taking that information, translating it and content on the line and when kids come independently to our screens to play games and watch television and do a variety of things we have information for them on information they care deeply part. in 2008 as research we do
in power, with sewer, with water that are not always proven technologies, but they're things that are enough proven you should take a bit of a risk and you should show others it can be done. >> we're showing the world, suddenly had wind turbines which they didn't have before. so, our team realizing that time would change, and realizing where the opportunities were today, we said, you know what, we started out as really something to control wind as an asset, when you combine today's technology becomes something entirely different. >> wind turbines in an urban environment is a relatively new concept. there are a few buildings in other major cities where they have installed wind turbines on the roof. and wind turbines in buildings are effective. >> the discussion was do we do that or not? and the answer was, of course. if they're not perfect yet, they're building a building that will last 100 years. in 100 years someone is going to perfect wind efficient turbines. if these aren't right, we'll replace them. we have time to do that. >> the building that's two renewable energy gene
for parthenogenesis, human biology, has it ever occurred? >> before technology, i'm sure technologically we can do all sorts of things. >> before technology. >> before technology do virgins -- how would i know? have i don't know, it seems to me if you're trying to establish the legitimacy of mary being a virgin one thing you would want to inquire is if it's ever happened independently of mythology and technology. >> well, i would wonder how i'd have access to that information. there is -- >> well, you're among all those boston scholars. what do you do in recreation, don't you ask questions like -- >> no, that tends not to be one of the things we talk about. with my grandmother, yes. with scholars, no. >> so you come down on the side that it was a true virgin birth, correct? >> i think it's very clear that the gospel writers thought so. appear we have no information with which to dispute them. i'm willing to go with it. >> may i say one more thing on this point? one of the things that the gospel writers do and matthew and luke in particular of the four that we have, is that they turn to using the bible
to steer. dyson solved those problems with their no loss of suction and steering technology, but those solutions cost nearly $600. two years ago shark introduced their amazing lift-away upright which truly revolutionized the vacuum industry because it too offered no loss of suction and swivel steering technology. but it also featured a sealed system, and it converted into a lightweight and portable vacuum, all for one-third the price of a dyson. even after two years of home usage, the result is over 95% of shark owners still recommend it to a friend. go online yourself to see all the four- and five-star reviews the shark has earned. all this proudly made shark the most recommended vacuum in america. and now shark has redefined the vacuum industry again! introducing the all-new, revolutionary, high-performance rotator lift-away! it's the greatest vacuum breakthrough in the last 20 years. a powerful, no loss of suction upright with enhanced swivel steering for superior maneuverability in and around furniture and tight corners. a lift-away for super lightweight and portable cleaning that
to create radical new energy storage technology. you know, way above what we have now. this is something very powerful, to be able to keep rovers going on the moon, in mars, things that could be useful, in your cell electric vehicles, something that just is a radical leap in new technology. but i don't want to go into a lot of detail on that. you'll hear more about nasa's efforts later. and what i'm going to do1r is ge a little more background on challenge-driven innovation. and i'm going to do that just by plaijerrizing some people because it makes it a loteasier for me. i want to look at this quote, prize is a very old -- an old idea that is surprisingly powerful in our modern society. this is by a study that by mckenzie and company, back in 2010. prize is a very old idea, very powerful in our modern society. surprisingly powerful in our modern society. mckenzie also said this, 32,000, in 2010, there were 32,000no competitions, competitions, prizes, awards. that's a big number. it could be bigger but it's a big number, for one year, 32,000 competitions happened. to continue on in myk
televisions and then there are mitsubishi, they're the leaders in technology only think of the big football stadiums, they do create those, would be good to your favorite movie theater this is the same technology so it is like a movie theater in your 206 $10.99 and every time we've done it to be sheet it has gone into the customer pack. i have been working out but check this out. in a john eastman needs to help me. hello. >>guest: i took it to you was about to go over backwards. >>guest: and >>host: knows everything there3 an about televisions and more importantly, nobody knows more about the lp or home theaters than you. there really are the best. >>guest: they make more dlp tepees and in the other manufacturers combined. it is digital light processing and if he could to a movie theater 80 percent in this country do feature premium dlp and of the washington and it was getting quality, grape color saturation in amazing definition, high resolution in your not losing some of the impact you normally would get when you get a lesser technology in the same dlp technology that you find it
at the center for democracy and technology. what is the current law when it comes to law enforcement and e-mails and cell phones? >> guest: the short answer is that is confused and the longer answer is for e-mail that is less than 180 days old law enforcement need to warrant -- for e-mail more than 180 years old, it is just a subpoena, so there's no judicial intervention, no high standard of proof. for documents you store in the clouds, if you store something with google docs and come back and edit it, that is available with a subpoena. cell phones, there is no statutory provision about location information. so the courts have been in different places. some say if it is real-time location, for that they need a warrant. others say this gps location for that they need a warrant. there is not a clear rule yet for cell phone. >> host: what are the changes the judicial committee has approved? >> guest: they focus on content of communications. they said it should matter how will the content is. it shouldn't matter whether you stored it with this kind of a communication service provider or that o
have on your longevity. >>> but first, shades of big brother. why a major technology provider wants to track your every move. >> and not so lucky. >>> we won't be seeing those graphic cigarette pack warnings any time soon. yesterday they denied the government's request to reconsider the labels, which the fda is trying to make a requirement. back in august a court confirmed that many manufactures do not have to comply with the government. >>> verizon is considering new technology that could track your every move. according to to a patent application, the company is trying to create a dvr type device that records you inside your home. the idea is to cater tv ads specifically to you, but some think it's more like big brother and it crosses the line. nbc technology contributors say many of us already use this kind of technology. >> just the idea that we would all be carrying around gps devices in our pockets, checking into our locations, telling our friends where we are, that would seem creepy five years ago, but nowadays everybody is doing it. >> i just want to enjoy my show, fall asle
.9%. erika miller takes a closer look at how technology is helping to boost safety and productivity. >> reporter: three years ago, this long island hospital had a problem: healthcare workers weren't cleaning their hands as often as required. >> 100,000 people die each year in the united states from hospital acquired infections. that's more than the number of people who die from breast cancer and from auto accidents. it's a huge problem, one that we want to make a dent in. >> reporter: lowering the number of infections is also good for the hospital's financial health. >> it increases length of stay. it doubles the cost of many operations. we're not reimbursed the same way that we used to for hospital-acquired infections. >> reporter: so the hospital tried an experiment. it put cameras at the entrance to patient rooms in its intensive care unit and tallied how many times workers followed hand hygiene procedures. the compliance rate w less than 10%. but once the hospital started posting the results for the shift publicly, the rate skyrocketed to over 90%. and there were other benefits:
or disabled have unfortunately historically been at the margins of new technologies when they are introduced. today, as broadband internet brings expanded opportunities in health care, education, and civic participation, projects like this one here in san francisco are critical to making sure that all communities have access to life changing technologies. [applause] high-speed internet connections make it possible for patients in rural areas to consult with medical specialists who are hundreds of miles away, for students to take online classes and universities across the country, and for governments to deliver services more efficiently and more easily to their constituents. for seniors, especially those whose families may live in different states or in different countries, broadband allows families to bond together in a way that telephone just never did. my own parents and all live in mexico city, and we are lucky because we both of broadband connections in our home. if a few weeks ago we got on skype. we set up the computer in our kitchen, and they set it up in their dining room but they in
of what the technology can matter is because we did not have to limit the school day anymore to the hours inside the school room. as -- there is much more we can do. i watch people here from a great school in sweden. and they have managed to create a portal in ways. i met a kid whose mother was an aris -- was a nurse. we are the only profession that admits we are failing in what we're doing for our kids and we all go home at 3:00. there has to be a way to think differently about the dimensions of the challenge. i think technology is part of that problem. about to go back to what condie started. as important as music and art and global history is, to two cannot read into basic mathematics -- kids who cannot read or do basic mathematics will not do higher or critical thinking. we have to figure out how to build the foundation and then build on the foundation. tragically we are doing either. rex you began by pointing out the fact that we are falling behind. 30, 50 years ago we ranked a lot higher than we did in basic skills sets. -- we ranked a lot higher in basic skills sets. >> a cautionar
and technology and invention and art and science come which no other primate has done. very simple example of primates creating tools for using language, but it was indefinitely expandable hierarchical fashion. >> host: so you're thinking of the main functions of the neo cortex has been this high-level functions such as decision-making, inhibiting and proper actions. i mean, the neo cortex is a huge number of things. >> guest: it does lots of things that high on both levels and uses the same algorithm. i've recognized the ages of objects for crossfires ofa and obvious functions that he got at the high-level, how to recognize and say she's pretty but that was funny. it exists at the highest level of the conceptual hierarchy. one powerful piece of evidence that came out was what happens to be one, a region of the neo cortex of the optic nerve stillson, generally the process is a very primitive pattern and images, like the ages of objects. so this low-level, simple patterns. what happens to it and it congenitally blind person? it actually gets taken over by the frontal cortex to help that pro
that as new technology comes along that people don't have to choose between using the new technology and keeping their privacy. we are pleased to hear that mtc is taking action that clipper action, although not as precise as information from a cell phone, can reveal a lot about a individual. it can reveal if you got on or off bart near a hospital, near a clinic, all sorts of things that may imply things about your personal life and particularly over a long period of time there is an extensive amount of information collected about a person. are they going to church on a regular basis. are they going to baseball games when they are supposed to be at work? i think it is important to recognize that these records should be respected, should be treated as private information and as the commission said, should be looked at and retained only as long as necessary for operational purposes, not because it's cheap to retain data but because you need them for fraud. i'd like to demonstrate to the committee, this is an application for an android app >> what is it called again? fare bot it req
, one of which is directing the department of technology to host quarterly radio communication stakeholder meetings with the department of emergency management, sfmta, the public utilities commission, police, fire, and the motorola bay with staff to ensure there is clear and consistent communication about the status of the current and future planned radio communication projects, and directing the sfmta to provide regular reports back to coit and their subcommittees on the project -- on the progress of this project. in addition, in terms of the regular projects for the city, coit has directed the department of technology to do a study as there is not a plan for the current facilities, the condition of those facilities, and recommendations on how to proceed for other city departments' requirements, technical specifications, timing and a budget for the rest of the city to move forward for their -- to upgrade their radio and data communications. i would also note that the regional motorola bay width system regarding that project in february of 2012, the u.s. congress enacted the mi
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 787 (some duplicates have been removed)